Epic Fail: Obama NLRB Gives Unions Access to Employers’ Email Systems

Posted by Ryan O'Donnell on Mon, Dec 15, 2014 @ 10:35 AM

Earlier this week, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a decision (Purple Commc’ns Inc) giving employees the right to use employers’ email systems for non-business purposes—including union organizing. This ruling overturns the Board’s 2007 decision in Register Guard, and opens up yet another front in the partisan Board’s war against employers.

In its decision, the Board declared the analysis in Register Guard to be “clearly incorrect,” and one that focuses “too much on employers’ property rights and too little on the importantance of email as a means of workplace commutation.” As a result of this ruling, agues the Board, the NLRB “failed to adequately protect employees’ rights under the Act” and abdicated its responsibility to “adapt the Act to the changing patterns of industrial life.” Indeed, throughout its analysis, the Board justifies its ruling by referencing email’s new role as the “primary means of workplace discourse.”

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Having dismantled Register Guard, the Board will now adopt a “presumption that employees who have been given access to the employer’s email system in the course of their work are entitled to use the system to engage in statutorily protected discussions about their terms and conditions of employment while on nonworking time.”

In an attempt to mollify employers, the Board offers the following three limitations on employee’s ability to use email for organizing purposes:

  1. This decision applies only to employees who have been granted access to the employer’s email system in the course of their work; employers are not required to provide such access
  2. Employers may justify a total ban on non-work use of email by demonstrating that special circumstances make the ban necessary to maintain production or discipline.
  3. This decision does not address nonemployees or any other type of electronic communication.

These limitations, however, offer little solace to employers already struggling to comply with the avalanche of union-friendly regulations churned out by an increasingly hostile NLRB.

A Powerful Dissent

The Board’s decision in Purple Commc’ns Inc., is unprecedented. As Board Member Philip Miscimarra notes in his dissent, “The [National Labor Relations] Act has never previously been interpreted to require employers, in the absence of discrimination, to give employees access to business systems and equipment for NLRA-protected activities that employees could freely conduct by other means.” Furthermore, it is all but impossible “to determine whether or what communications violate restrictions against solicitation during working.”

Member Johnson, who penned his own 32-page dissent, hammered the majority’s decision for essentially forcing employers to subsidize speech in violation of the U.S. Constitution. Johnson argues, “The First Amendment violation is especially pernicious because the Board now requires an employer to pay for its employees to freely insult its business practices, services, products, management, and other coemployees in its own email. All of this is now a matter of presumptive right…”

Looking forward, Johnson’s dissent warns that “Taken to its extreme, the majority’s…rationale would just as easily apply to taking over an employer auditorium, or conference room in the middle of the workday during an employer presentation/conference.

The Road Ahead

On a practical level, however, employers must now re-evaluate their internal rules and regulations regarding employee use of company email. Specifically, Purple Commc’ns Inc has now rendered most employee handbooks obsolete; employers should, over the next few weeks, review their employee email communications policy, and contact their labor counsel to examine how this stunning new decision will impact existing company policies.

Tags: NLRB, Unions, National Labor Relations Board, right to unionize, Register Guard, violation of National Labor Relations, Labor Law